ulaulaman:

A beautiful photo of Orion Nebula by italian photographer Marco T. via Universe Today

ulaulaman:

A beautiful photo of Orion Nebula by italian photographer Marco T. via Universe Today

cwnl:

Eclipse above Corona Del Mar
The total lunar eclipse of 10 December 2011 is photographed near the moonset in the morning twilight over calm waters of the Pacific Ocean at the Little Corona beach, Orange County, Southern California.
by Wally Pacholka

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Eclipse above Corona Del Mar

The total lunar eclipse of 10 December 2011 is photographed near the moonset in the morning twilight over calm waters of the Pacific Ocean at the Little Corona beach, Orange County, Southern California.

by Wally Pacholka

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NGC 1977 The Running Man Nebula
by Francione Fabrizio

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NGC 1977 The Running Man Nebula

by Francione Fabrizio

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NGC 1569: Starburst in a Dwarf Irregular Galaxy
Grand spiral galaxies often seem to get all the glory, flaunting their young, bright, blue star clusters in beautiful, symmetric spiral arms. But small, irregular galaxies form stars too. In fact, as pictured here, dwarf galaxy NGC 1569 is apparently undergoing a burst of star forming activity, thought to have begun over 25 million years ago.
Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA);
Acknowledgement: A. Aloisi (STScI/ESA) et al.

cwnl:

NGC 1569: Starburst in a Dwarf Irregular Galaxy

Grand spiral galaxies often seem to get all the glory, flaunting their young, bright, blue star clusters in beautiful, symmetric spiral arms. But small, irregular galaxies form stars too. In fact, as pictured here, dwarf galaxy NGC 1569 is apparently undergoing a burst of star forming activity, thought to have begun over 25 million years ago.

Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA);

Acknowledgement: A. Aloisi (STScI/ESA) et al.

cwnl:

Hidden Galaxy IC 342
Similar in size to other large, bright spiral galaxies, IC 342 is a mere 7 million light-years distant in the long-necked, northern constellation Camelopardalis.
Image Credit & Copyright: Ed Henry (Hay Creek Observatory)

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Hidden Galaxy IC 342

Similar in size to other large, bright spiral galaxies, IC 342 is a mere 7 million light-years distant in the long-necked, northern constellation Camelopardalis.

Image Credit & Copyright: Ed Henry (Hay Creek Observatory)

Solar system-themed chocolates, called “Wakusei Shokora” (Planet Chocolates) come from the chocolate shop in Rihga Royal hotel in Kita-ku, Osaka. Each chocolate is priced at 400 yen, and a box of eight is available for 3,200 yen.

POSTED décembre 21, 2011 @ 23:04 WITH 169 578 notes
REBLOGGED FROM: skew (SOURCE: aria-to-aria)
hakuriver:

NASA- Hubble Serves Up a Holiday Space Angel
NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope presents a festive holiday greeting that’s out of this world. The bipolar star-forming region, called Sharpless 2-106, looks like a soaring, celestial snow angel. The outstretched “wings” of the nebula record the contrasting imprint of heat and motion against the backdrop of a colder medium.
Read More

hakuriver:

NASA- Hubble Serves Up a Holiday Space Angel

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope presents a festive holiday greeting that’s out of this world. The bipolar star-forming region, called Sharpless 2-106, looks like a soaring, celestial snow angel. The outstretched “wings” of the nebula record the contrasting imprint of heat and motion against the backdrop of a colder medium.

Read More

cwnl:

Red Moon Rising
This surreal, wintry scene is a composite picture recorded on December 10 as the Moon rose behind the Zagros Mountains of Iran. A total lunar eclipse was already in progress. The image combines nearly 500 successive frames taken over 1.5 hours beginning in twilight as the eclipsed Moon steadily climbed above the rugged landscape.
Image Credit & Copyright: Oshin Zakarian

cwnl:

Red Moon Rising

This surreal, wintry scene is a composite picture recorded on December 10 as the Moon rose behind the Zagros Mountains of Iran. A total lunar eclipse was already in progress. The image combines nearly 500 successive frames taken over 1.5 hours beginning in twilight as the eclipsed Moon steadily climbed above the rugged landscape.

Image Credit & Copyright: Oshin Zakarian

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Milky Way over Rock Pools
Copyright: Tunç Tezel

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Milky Way over Rock Pools

Copyright: Tunç Tezel

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NGC 6302: Bug Nebula
Distance: 3,500 Light Years Away From The Sun
NGC 6302 is a high excitation multi-polar planetary nebula first studied by Emerson Barnard in 1907. The complex planetary nebula is approximately 1900 years old and is expanding at 600 KM/sec.
Summary & Copyright: Robert Gendler

cwnl:

NGC 6302: Bug Nebula

Distance: 3,500 Light Years Away From The Sun

NGC 6302 is a high excitation multi-polar planetary nebula first studied by Emerson Barnard in 1907. The complex planetary nebula is approximately 1900 years old and is expanding at 600 KM/sec.

Summary & Copyright: Robert Gendler

cwnl:

Sungrazer Lovejoy: Significant Comet Plunges Towards The Sun
A comet nearly as wide as two football fields (200m) is plunging toward the sun where it will most likely be destroyed in a spectacular light show on Dec. 15/16.
Although Comet Lovejoy (C/2011 W3) could become as bright as Jupiter or Venus when it “flames out,” the glare of the sun will hide the event from human eyes. Solar observatories in space, however, will have a grand view. Yesterday the brightening comet entered the field of view of NASA’s STEREO-B spacecraft.
“You can clearly see the comet heading diagonally through the images,” says Karl Battams of the Naval Research Lab who prepared the animation. “During the 16-hour sequence, the comet brightens from magnitude +8 to +6.5, approximately.”
It will soon grow much brighter. “This comet is a true sungrazer, and will skim approximately 140,000 km (1.2 solar radii) above the solar surface on Dec. 15/16,” notes Battams. At such close range, solar heating will almost certainly destroy the icy interloper,creating a cloud of vapor and comet dust that will reflect lots of sunlight. The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) will have a particularly good view.

cwnl:

Sungrazer Lovejoy: Significant Comet Plunges Towards The Sun

A comet nearly as wide as two football fields (200m) is plunging toward the sun where it will most likely be destroyed in a spectacular light show on Dec. 15/16.

Although Comet Lovejoy (C/2011 W3) could become as bright as Jupiter or Venus when it “flames out,” the glare of the sun will hide the event from human eyes. Solar observatories in space, however, will have a grand view. Yesterday the brightening comet entered the field of view of NASA’s STEREO-B spacecraft.

“You can clearly see the comet heading diagonally through the images,” says Karl Battams of the Naval Research Lab who prepared the animation. “During the 16-hour sequence, the comet brightens from magnitude +8 to +6.5, approximately.”

It will soon grow much brighter. “This comet is a true sungrazer, and will skim approximately 140,000 km (1.2 solar radii) above the solar surface on Dec. 15/16,” notes Battams. At such close range, solar heating will almost certainly destroy the icy interloper,creating a cloud of vapor and comet dust that will reflect lots of sunlight. The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) will have a particularly good view.

cwnl:

Thor’s Helmet: NGC 2359 in Canis Major
Distance 15,000 light years
In astrophotographs NGC 2359 has an ethereal quality. Surprisingly the outward appearance strongly contradicts the violent events which gave rise to the peculiar nebula. NGC 2359 is a prototypical wind blown bubble powered by the extremely massive and unstable Wolf-Rayet star HD 56925.
These types of stars (only about 300 are known presently) represent a late evolutionary phase of massive O-type blue giants which have become unstable in the late stages of their short stellar life. WR stars heavily influence the surrounding interstellar medium.
There are several basic types of nebulae associated with WR stars which run the gamut from concentric rings (NGC 6888), wind blown bubbles (NGC 7635), to filamentary type nebulae (NGC 2359). NGC 2359 consists of two distinct components.
—Credit Copyright: Robert Gendler

cwnl:

Thor’s Helmet: NGC 2359 in Canis Major

Distance 15,000 light years

In astrophotographs NGC 2359 has an ethereal quality. Surprisingly the outward appearance strongly contradicts the violent events which gave rise to the peculiar nebula. NGC 2359 is a prototypical wind blown bubble powered by the extremely massive and unstable Wolf-Rayet star HD 56925.

These types of stars (only about 300 are known presently) represent a late evolutionary phase of massive O-type blue giants which have become unstable in the late stages of their short stellar life. WR stars heavily influence the surrounding interstellar medium.

There are several basic types of nebulae associated with WR stars which run the gamut from concentric rings (NGC 6888), wind blown bubbles (NGC 7635), to filamentary type nebulae (NGC 2359). NGC 2359 consists of two distinct components.

Credit Copyright: Robert Gendler